Georgia DOT announces accelerated timeline for I-75 commercial vehicle lanes

Concept for I-75 commercial vehicle lanes (Georgia DOT photo)

The Georgia Department of Transportation has announced a major refresh to the Major Mobility Investment Program (MMIP), including accelerated timelines for some projects. The timeline improvements will complete these large-scale “mega projects” and deliver traffic benefits to residents sooner than first anticipated.

The MMIP is a collection of major projects designed to improve Georgia’s mobility, address safety concerns and bottlenecks, and reduce traffic congestion. The projects are funded through Georgia’s passing of the transportation funding act of 2015, also known as house bill 170.

I-75 Commercial Vehicle Lanes

The proposed I-75 commercial vehicle lanes are now scheduled to open in the second quarter of 2028, rather than the previously scheduled 2030. To accomplish this, construction will commence in 2024 with opportunities for public comment in the third quarters of 2020 and 2022.

The commercial vehicle lanes project plans to build two barrier-separated travel lanes for exclusive use by commercial vehicles on I-75 northbound between I-475 in Macon and SR 155 in McDonough. The northern terminus may change if Henry County builds the proposed interchange at Bethlehem Road.

I-85 Widening

Projects to widen Interstate 85 northeast of Atlanta will be completed four years earlier than first scheduled. When complete, I-85 will be enlarged from four to six general purpose lanes (one additional travel lane in each direction) in Gwinnett and Jackson Counties.

Phase I of the widening project is under construction now between I-985 and Georgia 53, and will be completed in 2020. Phase II of the project will continue construction north to US 129, breaking ground in 2021 and opening in 2023. These projects are building the additional lanes within the center median of the existing interstate avoiding costly right of way acquisition.

I-285 Express Lanes

The proposed I-285 Express Lanes have been broken up into smaller projects to accelerate short-term improvements to the perimeter highway while continuing conversations with the community about the future express lanes.

Georgia DOT has identified six I-285 advanced improvement projects. These improvements were already programmed within the larger express lane projects, but will now be delivered individually to accelerate their completion. The advanced improvement projects include:

  • I-285 westbound collector-distributor lanes between Ashford Dunwoody Road and Chamblee Dunwoody Road, to be completed in the third quarter of 2023.
  • I-285 / Peachtree Industrial Boulevard interchange improvements, to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2023.
  • I-285 westside railroad crossings, to be completed in the first quarter of 2025.
  • I-285 westside bridge replacements, to be completed in the first quarter of 2026.
  • I-285 eastside bridge replacements, to be completed in the third quarter of 2024.
  • I-285 westbound auxiliary lane extension between Roswell Road and Riverside Drive, to be completed in the third quarter of 2024.

The proposed I-285 Express Lanes have been broken into four project segments instead of the previous three segments. When complete, the projects will provide managed lanes across north metro Atlanta along I-285.

Project segments include the following:

  • I-285 Westside, between I-20 and Paces Ferry Road, to be completed in the first quarter of 2032.
  • I-285 West Metro, between Paces Ferry Road to Georgia 400, to be completed in the first quarter of 2032.
  • I-285 East Metro, between Georgia 400 and Henderson Road, including express lanes on GA 400 between I-285 and North Springs MARTA Station, to be completed in the first quarter of 2029.
  • I-285 Eastside, between Henderson Road and I-20, to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2028.

All project schedules are subject to further revisions. Residents are encouraged to visit the state’s MMIP website for more information.

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